in

Self-Repair: We May Be Able to Regrow Cailage

Humans may lack the salamander skill of regrowing a limb, but a new study suggests they do have some capacity to restore cailage in their joints.

The findings run counter to a widely held belief: Because the cailage cushioning your joints lacks its own blood supply, your body can’t repair damage from an injury or the wear-and-tear of aging.

And that, in pa, is why so many people eventually develop osteoahritis, where broken-down cailage causes pain and stiffness in the joints.

But that lack of blood supply does not mean there’s no regenerative capacity in the cailage, according to Dr. Virginia Byers Kraus, the senior researcher on the new study.

In fact, her team found evidence that human cailage can, to some degree, renew itself, using a molecular process similar to the one that allows a salamander to grow a new limb.

The researchers are calling it the “inner salamander capacity.”

“For the first time, we have evidence that the joint has the capacity to repair itself,” said Kraus, a professor at Duke University School of Medicine, in Durham, Noh Carolina.

Specifically, she explained, that capability exists in a “gradient.” It’s greatest in the ankle, less apparent in the knee, and lowest in the hip.

And that makes sense if this repair capability is an aifact of evolution, according to Kraus. Animals that regenerate tissue have the greatest capacity for it in the distal poions of the body — the pas “most likely to get chewed off.”

Dr. Scott Rodeo, an ohopedic surgeon not involved in the study, said the findings raise some interesting questions.

For one, he said, could this be a paial explanation for why osteoahritis is common in the knees and hips, but not the ankles?

“It’s been assumed that it’s related to the biomechanics of the joints,” said Rodeo, an attending surgeon at the Hospital for Special Surgery, in New York City.

But this study, he said, suggests there might be intrinsic differences in the joints’ ability to repair cailage.

The other major question, Rodeo said, is whether this newfound human capacity can translate into new treatments for ahritis. “Can we better understand the basic biology, and harness it?” he asked.

For the study, Kraus and her colleagues analyzed proteins in samples of joint cailage that had been removed from patients having surgery. The researchers developed a method for gauging the “age” of those proteins, based on the premise that young proteins have little to no evidence of “conversions” of amino acids (the building blocks of proteins), while older proteins have many conversions.

Overall, the investigators found, ankle cailage showed the greatest number of young proteins. Knee cailage looked more middle-aged, and hip cailage had relatively few young proteins and plenty of old.

In addition, the study found, molecules called microRNAs seem to regulate the process. They were more abundant in ankle cailage than tissue from knees and hips, and in the top layers of cailage, versus the deeper layers.

As it happens, microRNAs also help salamanders regrow lost limbs.

The findings were published online Oct. 9 in the journal Science Advances.

It all raises the possibility that the innate repair capacity in cailage can be augmented, according to Kraus. Could, for example, injectable microRNA drugs be used to boost cailage self-repair?

No one is saying science is close to helping humans grow new limbs. But, Kraus said, understanding the fundamental mechanisms behind tissue regeneration — figuring out what salamanders have that people are missing — could eventually lead to ways to repair various tissues in the human body.

Rodeo agreed. “Can we learn lessons from animals that do regenerate tissue, and apply that to humans?”

Both he and Kraus said there is a “huge” need for innovative ways to treat osteoahritis, which affects roughly 27 million Americans, according to the Ahritis Foundation. There is no cure, and current treatments are aimed at managing symptoms.

When people are disabled by ahritis, Kraus noted, that can also raise their risk of other major health problems, including type 2 diabetes and hea disease.

What do you think?

471 points
Upvote Downvote

Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading…

0

Comments

0 comments

Memory Tests for Seniors May Not Be Effective for Women

Healthy Diet Can Stave off Depression